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6 Tips To Bulletproof Your Running This Summer

6 Tips To Bulletproof Your Running This Summer

It’s spring time and for many it’s a sign to start getting fit for summer. For those who had been hibernating during winter it is worth taking note of these following tips to bulletproof yourself for the months of running ahead.

 

  1. Remember you are exposing your body to increase stresses and strains that it may not be accustomed to. Many runners experience injury in their first 8 weeks by doing too much, too fast, too soon. Increase running volume by no more than 10% every 2 weeks.
  2. If you are taking up running for the first time, allow 48 hours between runs during the first four weeks. You can do other lower impact exercise on alternate days such as cycling, swimming and strength training.
  3. Break up your first few runs into run/walk intervals. For example 1 minute run/1 minute walk for 20-30 minutes. 
  4. Run with a shorter step and higher cadence. Pick the foot up as you swing the leg through and land with a verticals shin and bent knee joint in the front of the hip. Run tall with an upright posture. As you improve in fitness and strength your running technique will feel easier.
  5. Strength Training/Pilates will help your running performance and reduce the risk of injury. Runners need strong hips, trunk muscles and ankles to move well, maintain good posture and prevent injury. Two-three #strength training sessions is recommended per week focusing on whole body ground based exercises such as squats, lunges, deadlifts and step ups. Good movement and technique must be trained before adding resistance.
  6. Make sure you have the appropriate equipment/footwear. Nothing more likely to cause injury/discomfort than this. Find the runner that is most comfortable for you or a brand you trust and have used previously in the past with good results.

 

If you have pain running and you’re unsure about why, STOP! Go see your GP or Physiotherapist, find out why you have a problem and then deal with it. Many running related pains are easily dealt with, but some, if left untreated, can become chronic problems.

Enjoy your running! Every session you do doesn’t have to be better than the last one. Schedule easy runs for yourself where you don’t worry about pace and just enjoy a nice easy trot!

Saturday Acute Injury Service

Saturday Acute Injury Service

Ever hurt yourself on a Friday night or Saturday and wished you could have your injury seen to? Did you know Physiotec now offers Injury Clinic every Saturday from 11:30am-1:30pm. One of our skilled Sports Injury & Performance Physiotherapists will be on staff every Saturday to cater for the acute injuries sustained during Friday night/Saturday. The right advice and early management makes all the difference. Get treatment/advice now. Don’t wait!!!

We also have a normal clinical service and pilates on Saturday morning, but reserve places with one of Sports Injury & Performance team specifically for acute injuries that require urgent assistance.

Physiotec Updates

Physiotec Updates

END OF YEAR ROUNDUP!

2015 in Review

2015 was a year of exciting change and growth for Physiotec. The clinic expanded physically, new staff came on board, our technology advanced, our physiotherapists further expanded their already high level of knowledge and we reached out to the community with involvement in sporting events, teaching locally and abroad and with social media.

The clinic expanded upstairs this year providing another large gym space, two more treatment rooms, a second waiting area, a meeting/teaching space for our staff and a second office. We have also taken on board a Patient Liaison Coordinator, Toni Corta. You may have heard from Toni who is responsible for helping track the progress of our patients with the aim of providing the best quality service possible. We pride ourselves on providing treatment that is up to date and informed by cutting edge scientific evidence. The information Toni collects will further help us determine which treatments provide the best outcomes in our patient population. Better outcomes achieved more rapidly for our clients continues to be our primary focus.

We also invest in technologies that can help us achieve this goal. Physiotec invested in an additional real time ultrasound machine used for muscle and tendon assessment, rehabilitation and biofeedback. Our ViMove system (wireless accelerometers for assessing movement) has undergone considerable advances with new programmes to assess and improve ‘core control’ and neck movement as well as advances in the knee and running modules. Our second gym has been equipped with a new reformer with a tower attachment and we also added a ladder barrel allowing a host of new exercise challenges. A spine corrector, two TWS sliders, a ballet bar, balance equipment, band stations, a weights station and much more can also be found in our new exercise area.

pilates gym new

Our physiotherapists are passionate about continually increasing their expertise. Our staff have been involved as treating physiotherapists in university research trials and have attended national Physiotherapy and Sports Medicine conferences and many workshops and lectures on topics such as Hip Pain, Hamstring Injuries, Bone Health, Women’s & Men’s Health (pelvic pain and pelvic floor function), Hypermobility, Dance Medicine, Running Injuries & Rehabilitation and Tendon Pain & Rehabilitation.

Our principal physiotherapist, Dr Alison Grimaldi has also contributed to the knowledge of other physiotherapists and health professionals in Australia and overseas through multiple presentations at the recent Australian Physiotherapy Association Biennial Conference at the Gold Coast and lectures and workshops presented at Pure Sports Medicine(London), PhysioUK (London), Centre for Sports and Exercise Medicine, William Harvey Research Institute (London), Neath Port Talbot Hospital (Wales, UK), the Sports Surgery Clinic (Dublin, UK) and the Australian Institute of Sport (Canberra).

Dublin lecture 2

Sports Surgery Clinic, Dublin

Alison also presented weekend courses for physiotherapists in Brisbane, Sydney, Melbourne and Canberra. She has continued her research involvement into management of gluteal tendon pain and hip joint pain through the University of Queensland and University of Melbourne and has co-authored three papers in peer reviewed scientific journals such as Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical TherapyMedicine and Science in Sports and Exercise and Sports Medicine Journal.

Physiotec has been more connected to the world in 2015, with increased activity on Twitter and Facebook. We aim to help keep our followers up to date with the latest research in physiotherapy by providing information on useful links, blogs and tips on injury prevention.  Not only are we active on social media, but we also launched a new and easy to navigate website where you can browse our services, get to know the staff, and read more news in physiotherapy. Here is link to our new website: Physiotec

As part of our goal to get our clients more fit and active throughout their recovery, Physiotec staff and patients participated in the International Women’s Day Fun Run which raises money for Breast Cancer.

international women's day

We have also worked hard to help our patients to achieve their own activity and work related goals. Staff physiotherapist, Eric Huang, who is the founder of Brisbane-based cycling group M.I.A, helped some of our clients earn cycling medals while managing to gain podium placings himself.

MIA

mia podium eric

We have helped clients achieve lifelong goals of overseas travel and returning to work after years of disability, but it is often the everyday things that have the most impact – walking upstairs painfree for the first time in months, being able to attend family or social gatherings, achieving a good night’s sleep. We always love to see our clients overcome their difficulties and reach their personal goals.

What’s up in 2016?

In this coming year, our physiotherapists will be attending conferences and courses around the world. Alison will be attending the Low Back & Pelvic Pain Congress in Singapore and lecturing and presenting at the International Federation of Orthopaedic Manipulative Physical Therapists in Glasgow, UK. She will also be teaching in London, Wales, Ireland, Paris, Hong Kong, Singapore and New Zealand, as well as her regular Australian courses. Sharon will be attending the First International Ehler-Dhanlos and Hypermobility symposium in the USA. Kirsty, will once again be working with elite tennis players at the Australian Open in Melbourne. Eric will be continuing to further his knowledge and performance in all things cycling. Megan will be furthering her expertise in Women’s Health and Tony & Louise will be sharing their knowledge with some part time tutoring at the University of Queensland.

We will also be joined by visiting psychologist, Carolyn Uhlmann, who has a focus on providing support for patients coping with acute and chronic pain, chronic illness or caring for a loved one with health problems. She can also assist those who are learning to adjust and cope with changes in health, medical events, mobility and independence.

With the new staff members, new gym, new Pilates programs, running assessments and spinal assessments, you can expect that we will be offering more at Physiotec as we continue to grow.

 

Osteoarthritis and Running

Osteoarthritis and Running

Does running accelerate the development of osteoarthritis?

There are so many misconceptions about running and how bad it can be for your joints. You may have

heard many friends and family members comment on this and they may have even tried to convince you to stop running and go swimming instead. Here is what the scientific research tells us so far:

Osteoarthritis (OA) is a musculoskeletal condition that involves degeneration of the joints and impact during weightbearing exercise such as running and may contribute to joint loads. There is very little evidence however, that running causes OA in the knees or hips. One study reported in 1985 by Sohn and Micheli compared incidence of hip and knee pain and surgery over 25 years in 504 former cross-country runners. Only 0.8% of the runners needed surgery for OA in this time and the researchers concluded that moderate running (25.4 miles/week on average) was not associated with increased incidence of OA.

In another smaller study of 35 older runners and 38 controls with a mean age of 63 years, researchers looked at progression of OA over 5 years in the hands, lumbar spine and knees (Lane et al. 1993) . They used questionnaires and x-rays as measurement tools. In a span of 5 years, both groups had some participants who developed OA- but found that running did not increase the rate of OA in the knees. They reported that the 12% risk of developing knee OA in their group could be attributed to aging and not to running. In 2008, a group of researchers reported results from a longitudinal study in which 45 long distance runners and 53 non-runners were followed for 21 years. Assessment of their knee X-Rays, revealed that runners did not have a higher risk of developing OA than the non-running control group. They did note however, that the subjects with worse OA on x-ray also had higher BMI (Body Mass Index) and some early arthritic change in their knees at the outset of the study.

Is it better to walk than to run?

It is a common belief that it must be better to walk than to run to protect your joints. In a recent study comparing the effects of running and walking on the development of OA and hip replacement risk, the incidence of hip OA was 2.6% in the running group, compared with 4.7% in the walking group (Williams et al 2013). The percentage of walkers who eventually required a hip replacement was 0.7%, while in the running group, it was lower at 0.3%. Although the incidence is small, the authors suggest the chance of runners developing OA of the hip is less than walkers.

In the same study, Williams and colleagues reinforced that running actually helped keep middle-age weight gain down. As excess weight may correlate with increased risk of developing OA, running may reduce the risks of OA. The relationship between bodyweight and knee OA has been well-established in scientific studies, so running for fitness and keeping your weight under control is much less likely to wear out your knees than being inactive and carrying excess weight. 

Is there a limit?

Recent studies have shown that we should be doing 30 minutes of moderate exercise daily to prevent cardiovascular disease and diabetes. But with running, researchers still have not established the exact dosage of runners that has optimal health effects. Hansen and colleagues’ review of the evidence to date reported that the current literature is inconclusive about the possible relationship about running volume and development of OA but suggested that physiotherapists can help runners by correcting gait abnormalities, treating injuries appropriately and encouraging them to keep the BMI down.

We still do not know how much is “too much” for our joints. However, we do know that with age, we expect degenerative changes to occur in the joints whether we run or not. Osteoarthritis is just as common as getting grey hair. The important thing is that we keep the joints as happy and healthy as possible.

How do you start running?

If you are not a runner and would

like to start running, walking would be a good way to start and then work your way up to short running intervals and then longer intervals as you improve your fitness and allow time for your body to adapt.

Therfore, running in general is not bad for the joints. It does not seem to increase our risk of developing OA in the hips and knees. But the way you run, the way you train and how fast you change your running frequency and distance may play a role in future injuries of the joints.

But that’s another story. Watch this space for more running gems….

Image by: Pixabay

References:

Cymet and Sinkov 2006. Does Long Distance running cause OA. The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, June 2006, Vol. 106, 342-345.

Hansen et al 2012. Does Running cause osteoarthritis in the hip or knee?. Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. 4 (5) 117-121.

Lane et al. 1993. The Risk of OA with Running and Ageing. Year Longitudinal Study. Journal of Rheumatology (20) 461-468

Sohn et al. 1985. The Effect of Running on pathogenesis of OA in hips and knees. Clin Orthop Res (9) 106-109

Williams 2013. Effects of Running and Walking on OA and Hip Replacement Risk. Med

Sci Sports Exerc. 45 (7) 1292-1297